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Templates Make Cutting Crown Molding a Breeze

Crown Molding Templates

Make a set of handy templates to help you set up a compound miter saw for common crown molding cuts. (Note: These instructions are for molding with a 45⁰ spring angle.  Adjustments for a 38⁰ spring angle are given at the end.) You will need four templates: two for outside corners and two for inside corners. To make them, you need about 6′ of scrap crown molding.

First, set a left bevel (vertical tilt to the left) of 30⁰ on your compound mitersaw. This bevel angle will not change for any cut. Also, your molding will always lay flat, face up, on the mitersaw.

As you make each template, mark the set-up instructions directly on the template (as shown in the photo). Each template should be at least 6″ long. Following are the instructions for each template.


Outside right template:

Top of molding against the fence

“Keeper” is right of the blade

Bevel left at 30⁰

Miter right at 35.3⁰

Templates OR


Outside left template:

Bottom of molding against fence

“Keeper” is right of blade

Bevel left at 30⁰

Miter left at 35.3⁰

Templates OL


Inside right template:

Bottom of molding against fence

“Keeper” is left of blade

Bevel left at 30⁰

Miter left at 35.3⁰

Templates IR


Inside left template:

Top of molding against fence

“Keeper” is left of blade

Bevel left at 30⁰

Miter right at 35.3⁰

Templates IL


Now with these templates you will never have to scratch your head and make a ton of “test” cuts. Simply place the template against the wall to make sure that you have the correct one, and then use the instructions on the template to make the right cut.

Note: For molding with a spring angle of 38⁰, use a bevel angle of 33.9⁰ and a miter angle of 31.6⁰, instead of the angles given in the instructions above.

14 Comments

  • Drew

    March 22, 2017 at 11:15 am

    Great advice for cutting your own crown molding. This would have been helpful when I did my living room a few months ago. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  • Pam

    May 7, 2017 at 5:22 pm

    Please recheck pictures and which way “keeper” should be. I wasted crown molding following these pictures and directions exactly. I found them to be incorrect.
    Very frustrating to say the least. I could have had my crown molding halfway done by the time I figured out these were wrong.
    Warning to others!

    Reply
    • Acme Tools

      May 8, 2017 at 9:29 am

      Hi Pam, Thank you for your comments and we apologize for any issue our post has caused. We check accuracy of all posts before they are uploaded to our Blog and in this case we have even consulted several master trim carpenters. The images are correct and the suggestions the professionals have is that the crown needs to be laying flat on your miter saw and to pay close attention to if the top of bottom of the crown is against the fence for these images to be used.

      Thank you,
      Acme Tools

      Reply
    • Gwen

      August 13, 2017 at 8:45 am

      Pam,
      Your miter examples are correct. I do a lot of trim work and 5 out of 5 got yours wrong, but not because they are wrong. I did experiment to see why the guy said yours is incorrect. All of them walk in a room look at the corners and said left on left and right on right. They are not looking at the corners. You might want to simplify that by showing them to mark their corners first left and right. Once I did that not one of the five got it wrong. Thanks

      Reply
  • Leanna

    June 28, 2017 at 9:35 pm

    Thank you for supplying some well needed templates for miter cuts, I don’t know why but it would seem so easy but is anything but. I want to ask if the same principal would apply to quarter round for floor boards?

    Reply
    • Acme Tools

      June 29, 2017 at 8:10 am

      Hello,
      Thank you for your comments. The cutting of floor trim is similar to crown molding but the angles are different so these templates would not work. We suggest that when cutting quarter round for a floor trim application that you position the material against the fence and base of the miter saw exactly as it would lay between the floor and the wall. Your blade bevel can be at 90deg and your miter angle is 1/2 of what the complete angle of the wall is. If your wall is exactly at 90deg then you will make each miter cut (right and left) at 45deg. For the best miter fit it is a good practice to measure each corners angle, they are rarely at 90deg but usually within 1-3deg.

      Inside corners will use a left hand piece with a / miter on it and the right hand piece will have a \ miter on it (long points of the miter are away from you). This is exactly opposite for an Outside corner where the left hand piece will have a \ miter and the right hand piece will have the / miter (long points of the miter are closer to you).

      Thank you,
      Acme Tools

      Reply
  • Scott roop

    July 28, 2017 at 1:45 pm

    All well and good if you want more stuff to try and not loose. Easiest way is to cut crown upside down and backwards. 45 degrees swing right or left depending on the corner gives you an outside miter and to the left gives you an inside corner that you can cope for a perfect fit. No tilting the head, no weird angles to remember, just 45 degrees left or right with the crown upside down and backwards. Sounds complicated? Not really, try a scrap piece and you will find it’s very simple. 10″ miter saw will cut 3 5/8″ crown, 12 miter saw will cut 4 5/8″ crown and up to 5 1/4″. Have fun, be safe and never cross hands while using a miter saw.

    Reply
    • Acme Tools

      July 31, 2017 at 7:26 am

      Hello, Thank you for your comment. There are several ways to cut crown molding we are just explaining one way. Thank you for the safety reminder. We agree that safety should come first when working with any tool and when using a miter saw you should never cross your hands.

      Thank you,
      Acme Tools

      Reply
    • Acme Tools

      July 31, 2017 at 7:23 am

      Hello, Thank you for your comment. We have not seen these for sale anywhere but as long as you follow the instructions you can make your own out of scraps that normally would have been thrown away or burned.

      Thank you,
      Acme Tools

      Reply
  • Joe

    September 25, 2017 at 7:30 am

    Im ready to start my crown project, made my first cut and it’s wrong. So I’ve stopped because I’m missing something. When you say “inside right” that’s not the cut on the right side of the trim board, it’s the right side of the corner?
    2nd question: when I’m measuring the length of trim board, where do I make my mark to cut, top or bottom?

    Reply
    • Acme Tools

      September 25, 2017 at 9:07 am

      Hello, Thank you for your comment. “Inside Right” refers to the type of corner, inside or outside, and the right or left refers to the direction that piece comes into the corner when on the wall.

      Thank you,
      Acme Tools

      Reply
  • Ian

    October 12, 2017 at 6:58 am

    As per your reply on the 1/4 round if you measure the corner and say it I’d 94 degrees, you would set the saw at 47 degrees. But how will that affect your crown modding with all the compound angles? Thanks

    Reply
    • Acme Tools

      October 12, 2017 at 8:13 am

      Hi Ian, Thank you for your comment. The templates are designed for corners that are at 90deg. If the corner is larger or smaller than 90deg some adjustments will have to be made. In the past we have seen a chart that will give you the compound and miter settings for the different corner measurements but have not been able to locate one to get the measurements for the 94deg corner you are working with. If we locate it we will either provide a link or re-create the chart in a separate blog post.

      Thank you,
      Acme Tools

      Reply

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